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AEST News

NEWS RELEASE

 

 

January 15, 2005                                                       Contact: Terrey Kenney

For Release – All Media                                           President ,CEO

AEST, Inc.                                                                    tkenney@aesti.com

                                            510-886-6819 (Fax)

 

 

AEST, Inc., a Hayward, California based clean energy technologies research and

development company,  announced today that it recently installed its patented roadway

power generation system at the Port of Oakland, California.  Called the “Dragon Power

Station” (DPS), AEST’s alpha prototype DPS captures the unused kinetic energy of traffic

to generate environmentally safe “green” power (electricity).

 

The idea behind this revolutionary technology is that of the co-founder and chief

executive officer, Terry Kenny.  Kenney says that the “DPS technology’s approach to

power generation is both simple and novel”.  He says his company’s  plan is to “provide

California’s energy planners a means for transforming the headache of automotive traffic

into a resource”.  Kenney, and his development team initially see the use of this new

resource “will be at California’s metered freeway on and off ramps, truck depots, boarder

crossing, port authorities, airports and railroads, as well as large parking facilities”.

 

The concept behind AEST’s DPA roadway power generator is derived from an adaptation of

an old means of generating electricity from rivers and streams. In those proven

applications, a fluid, water, turns a turbine, which drives a generator.  In AEST’s innovated

adaptation, water is replaced by hydraulic fluid pressurized by the movement of cars and

trucks over a plate that depresses under their weight.  As a result, the fluid is pressurized

and is then discharged into a hydraulic motor, which acts like a turbine, driving a

generator much like the kind proven in micro hydro electrical production around the

world.

 

Kenney thinks that the potential energy represented by a single small vehicle “is only a

fraction of the potential of semi-tractor trailers.  Energy produced by earlier devices reliant

on small cars failed to produce sufficient power for each dollar spent and could not be

justified relative to alternative resources”.  In contrast, AEST’s design in this project is

robust enough to capture the potential of both cars and trucks and is simple enough to

be configured at the job site to meet the diverse needs of end users. Experiments on an

early prototype have shown that the new devices can be used at job sites where other

solutions are not practical and can be delivered at a price point that competes with solar

PV.  AEST’s DPS device can be deployed as a single unit or in a constellation of units, as

needed.

 

The potential energy represented by a single small vehicle is only one tenth the potential

of semi-tractor trailers. Energy produced by earlier devices reliant on small cars failed to

produce sufficient power for each dollar spent and could not be justified relative to

alternative resources.

In contrast, this design in this project is robust enough to capture the potential of both

cars and trucks and is simple enough to be configured at the job site to meet the diverse

needs of end users. Experiments on an early prototype have shown that the new devices

can be used at job sites where other solutions are not practical and can be delivered at a

price point that competes with solar PV. This device can be deployed as a single unit or in

a constellation of units, as needed.

Kenney thinks that his company’s innovative DPS power station will not only capture the

potential energy of vehicular traffic with the use of a “green” hydraulic system, but will

also exploit the vehicle weight of traffic by helping cars or trucks to decelerate to produce

electricity from a turbine, driven by a biodegradable fluid, pressurized by the pumping

action of plates or “steps” which are depressed as vehicles roll over them while stopping.

Kenney believes that the company’s DPS alpha prototype, installed at the Port of

Oakland, will demonstrate for planners that California’s energy portfolio will benefit from

commercializing the use of this hybrid energy capture technology to produce clean, cost

competitive electricity.

Polls

Where would you put a Dragon Power Station?

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